Oral Histories

Interview of Rossana Perez

Immigrant from El Salvador who worked with El Rescate and Clínica Monseñor Oscar A. Romero. Participated in founding of the Department of Central American Studies at California State University, Northridge.
Series:
Central Americans in Los Angeles in the 1980s
Topic:
Social Movements
Latina and Latino History
Central Americans in Southern California
Community Activism
Interviewer:
Hidalgo, LeighAnna
Interviewee:
Perez, Rossana
Persons Present:
Perez and Hidalgo
Place Conducted:
Perez’s home in Echo Park, Los Angeles
Supporting Documents:
Records relating to the interview are located in the office of the UCLA Library’s Center for Oral History Research.
Interviewer Background and Preparation:
The interview was conducted by LeighAnna Hidalgo, graduate student interviewer, UCLA Center for Oral History Research; Ph.D. Candidate in Chicana/o Studies Research. Hidalgo’s dissertation focused on grassroots activism of Black and Latina/o street vendor activists united in the movement to legalize their livelihoods in Los Angeles. The interviewer prepared for the interview by reading Nora Hamilton and Norma Chinchilla’s Seeking Community; Susan Coutin’s From Refugee to Immigrant; Rosanna Perez’s Flight to Freedom, and various archival articles from the Los Angeles Times.
Processing of Interview:
The interviewer prepared a timed log of the audio recording of the interview. The interviewee was given the opportunity to review the log in order to supply missing or misspelled names and to verify the accuracy of the content. The corrections made were entered into the text without further editing or review on the part of the Center for Oral History Research staff.
Length:
9 hrs
Language:
English
Copyright:
Regents of the University of California, UCLA Library.
Series Statement:
This series of interviews includes activists who were involved in founding and sustaining organizations in the Central American community in the 1980s. It examines the participants' activism and political persecution in Central America, their immigration to the U.S., and the ways they organized to serve the rapidly growing Central American community in Los Angeles.