Oral Histories

Interview of Bryon H. Atkinson (1984)

UCLA dean of students and athletic director. Interviewed because of connection to J.D. Morgan, UCLA tennis coach and athletic director.
Subtitle:
Right Man at the Right Time: J. D. Morgan
Series:
Right Man at the Right Time: J.D. Morgan
Topic:
Sports
UCLA and University of California History
UCLA Intercollegiate Athletics Staff
UCLA Administration
Interviewer:
Rose, David A.
Interviewee:
Atkinson, Byron H.
Supporting Documents:
Records relating to the interview are located in the office of the UCLA Library's Center for Oral History Research.
Language:
English
Copyright:
Regents of the University of California, UCLA Library.
Series Statement:
This series documents the contribution of UCLA Athletics Coach J.D. Morgan through interviews with individuals who had worked with Morgan both inside and outside the UCLA community.
Abstract:
Byron H. Atkinson on his memories of J. D. Morgan: Together with Morgan as UCLA undergraduates; Morgan’s undergraduate academic and athletic activities; War experiences; Postwar campus employment; As tennis coach and associate business manager; Professional contact with Morgan in l950s; Morgan’s chairmanship of Dykstra Hall planning committee; Work habits; Integration of work and family lives; Fundraising; Selection as athletic director; Formation of Athletic Advisory Board; Special Admissions Committee; Issues before the Athletic Advisory Board; Morgan’s approach to hiring decisions; Initial priority as athletic director: upgrade all facilities; Pauley Pavilion; Expanding and upgrading minor sports; The question of a campus football stadium; Areas of major involvement with Morgan; Equitable disciplinary action; Family life; Disciplinary action against athletes; Walter Byers; Morgan’s attitude toward violations of NCAA rules; Ticket selling by athletes; Morgan’s integrity; Salesmanship on the Special Admissions Committee; Philosophy of intercollegiate athletics; UCLA’s conditional admission summer program for athletes; Financing women’s athletics; Morgan “was color-blind as far as race was concerned”; Athletes and the press; Controversial conference Rose Bowl votes; Morgan’s attitude toward drugs and drinking; Weight problem; Drug use among UCLA athletes; NCAA jurisdiction over television appearances; Morgan’s disdain for “socialism” in intercollegiate athletic policy; Conference-wide pooling of revenues; Summation.