Oral Histories

Interview of Norman P. Miller (1988)

UCLA’s first vice chancellor of student and campus affairs and coordinator of UCLA’s involvement in the 1984 Olympic Games.
Subtitle:
UCLA and the XXIIIrd Olympiad
Topic:
Sports
UCLA and University of California History
UCLA Administration
Interviewer:
Hodak, George A.
Interviewee:
Miller, Norman P.
Supporting Documents:
Records relating to the interview are located in the office of the UCLA Library's Center for Oral History Research.
Language:
English
Copyright:
Regents of the University of California, UCLA Library.
Abstract:
Background and experience with the Olympics; bidding to bring the 1984 Olympic Games to Los Angeles; responsibilities and positions held by Miller at UCLA; the Los Angeles bicentennial; the concept of "Spartan Olympics"; the dual-village concept; getting approval and endorsement from the University of California regents; problems surrounding the use of UCLA for Olympic accomodations; bid presentation to the International Olympic Committee (IOC); financial liability and responsibility issues; political influences on the Olympic Games; resolution of financial matters; the UCLA Olympic Games Office; international visitors to UCLA; meeting the concerns of local homeowners; groundwork and negotiations between the Los Angeles Olympic Organizing Committee (LAOOC) and UCLA; short-term and long-range needs; the Olympic headquarters building; planning and developing the Olympic Village; resolving problems of contract agreements and decision-making processes; protocol and visiting delegations; developing lines of communication with LAOOC; Miller's coordinative role; public relations duties; UCLA's relationship with LAOOC after 1981; providing services for LAOOC; campus security and overlapping jurisdictions; corporate sponsorships; community relations and support; opportunities for student involvement; Associated Students UCLA and the games; athletes interested in meeting Americans; creating a work force; Soviet bloc boycott; IOC examination of village accomodations; financial support to insure participation; opportunities gained by smaller countries due to the boycott; international sports; qualifying stages for athletes' eligibility; accomodations and security concerns; controversy over commercialization of the torch relay; televising the Olympics; community relations in South Central Los Angeles; comparing the University of Southern California's Olympic Village with UCLA's; UCLA's involvement in the Olympic Arts Festival; the Royal Shakespeare Company; competitions at UCLA; UCLA Olympic athletes; tennis as a demonstration sport; thoughts about the Olympic Games returning to Los Angeles in 2004; Roberta Wollin; James M. Klain; Miller's relationship with UCLA since retirement; commitments outside the university.